White As Snow

by Kathleen Sawyer

“White as Snow” is a piece of book art that navigates the difficult ideological transition towards adulthood. The period of child development known as ‘foreclosure’ describes the refusal to enter the experimental phase most often associated with adolescence, in which the child tries out different experiences — often rebellious — as a fundamental part of forming their personality. A child who forecloses this period of freedom is unwilling to step outside their knowledge of themselves; instead choosing to remain frozen in one incarnation.

This work implements the ‘classic’ version of the Snow White story as a metaphor for foreclosure, as well as hinting at the consequences involved in maintaining purity and goodness (as defined in the fairytale genre itself). In the narrative, the active and cunning Queen is seen as transgressive and is punished, while the passive and personality-deficient Snow White is lauded as the ‘good’ character; a model for children to emulate. To step outside the rigid and restricted definition of what amounts to a positive female role model is to be irrevocably tainted as ‘bad.’ Anne Sexton’s poem on the subject depicts Snow White as a fragile china doll rolling her eyes open and shut, ever virginal, ever trapped within the limits of her self-imposed and immmobilising purity. The drawings animate as the pages are flipped, revealing a young girl (the model used was twelve) trapped under ice which slowly thaws, allowing her to blink at the viewer much like in the poem. However, the ice never fully melts and eventually freezes over once more, trapping the girl in the limits of her internalised self-restraint. In this way the character is ‘good’ only due to the lack of what is ‘bad;’ defined more by absence than presence.


Kathleen Sawyer is an art student and draughtsperson at Rhodes University, South Africa. Her Masters work investigates the societal impact of fairytales, focusing on themes of sexuality, femininity and coming-of-age. Her art can be found at KatSaw.com.

“White As Snow” won third place in Tiny Donkey’s Once Upon a Cartographer Contest.

Editor’s Note: Magic Mirrors on Every Wall

Locations are connected by wormholes.

Ask Neil Postman, media theorist. As early as the 19th century, new communications technology and mass media collapsed the space between local and distant. Postman writes that after news from Washington, D.C. made its way to Baltimore along the first telegraph lines on May 25, 1844 to be printed in the Baltimore Patriot that same afternoon, “The paper concluded its report by noting: ‘…we are thus enabled to give our readers information from Washington up to two o’clock. This is indeed the annihilation of space.'”[1]

Ask Amber Case, cyber anthropologist. She explains the concept of a wormhole by telling about how her father taught her the shortest distance between two points on a piece of paper is only a straight line if she ignored how the paper could be folded so that the two points touched.[2] While writing her anthropology thesis on cellphones, she “realized that everyone was carrying around wormholes in their pockets. They weren’t physically transporting themselves; they were mentally transporting themselves. They would click on a button, and they would be connected as A to B immediately.”

Ask your magic mirror, that display you hang on the wall, hold in your hand, or hide your eyes behind. At your command, your TV, computer, gaming console, smartphone, tablet, heads-up display, and virtual reality gear mirror your mind, your voice, your avatar, and, eventually, a wholly-immersed you through wormholes that remap location and body instantaneously to the hybrid realities—destinations where the analog and physical real world merges with or vanishes into digital and virtual new worlds. These places are not limited to their sights and sounds but will soon engage every sense. With emerging technologies surrounding your person, upon your person, within your person, your skin is a new skin, like your tongue, like your nose and ears and eyes. In so many new worlds to explore with your wormhole-enhanced cyborg physiology, you may find a home, or the horror of an endless virtual. At every destination on every wall there will wait a magic mirror, this hall of mirrors, this labyrinth in which you arrive so easily but cannot be certain that you arrived where you wanted to go.


This Editor’s Note was written by Tiny Donkey Editor Richard Leis.


[1] Postman, Neil. Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. New York: Penguin, 1985, 2005. 66. Kindle.

[2] Case, Amber. “We are all cyborgs now.” TEDWomen 2010. Dec. 2010. Web. 6 Dec. 2015. <http://www.ted.com/talks/amber_case_we_are_all_cyborgs_now>

Snow White and The Apple

by Jayme Russell

1. In Bluets, Maggie Nelson collects the color blue. Blue experiences, objects, and emotions. Pain, sadness, and song. She writes, “And so I fell in love with a color—in this case the color blue—as if falling under a spell…”

2. Once—She fell. UnconsciousFrail. PoisonBody. LipSugared. SilentWhite.

3. Sound and dream covered in a layer of white. Mary Ruefle’s Little White Shadow begins, “one in ruins/struck/notes whose sounds/spent a winter here.”

4. “Fresh snow fell on snow already fallen; when it ceased, the whole world was white,” writes Angela Carter in “The Snow Child.” I cover text/words/sound with a thick layer of white, building a background on which bright colors become brighter. To show just how red. Just how blue. Technicolor images breathe within the white landscape.

5. Ruefle erases book after book. As she puts it in Madness, Rack, and Honey, she takes words out of this world. With a stroke of the hand she blots them from existence.

6. “It calms me to think of blue as the color of death. I have long imagined death’s approach as the swell of a wave—a towering wall of blue,” Nelson says. But what of deathly pale? Covered/Cursed/Ruefled. The body. SkeletonEmaciated. LittleWhiteShadow. Heart beating. Veins pulsing. Alive but so thin. Speechless.

7. “I do not think I really have anything to say about poetry other than remarking that it is a wandering little drift of unidentified sound, and trying to say more reminds me of following the sound of a thrush into the woods on a summer’s eve—if you persist in following the thrush it will only recede deeper and deeper into the woods…” says Ruefle.

8. In the “Lady of the House of Love,” Angela Carter describes her Countess—a Snow White/Sleeping Beauty/vampire hybrid—as “only a shape, a shape imbued with a faint luminosity since it caught and reflected in its yellow surfaces what little light there was in the ill-lit room…” She is object, ghost, and archaic bride draped in satin and lace. Her prince is enthralled by the color of her lips: “he was disturbed, almost repelled, by her extraordinarily fleshy mouth, a mouth with wide, full, prominent lips of a vibrant purplish-crimson, a morbid mouth.” She is alive. She moves and breathes. Her sleeping curse lingers on her lips.

9. “At times I have been tempted to think that we dream more colorfully now because of the cinema,” Nelson insists. Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs was the first feature length, hand drawn animated film. Such bright colors titled white.

10. The queen says, “Yes girlie, now make a wish and take a bite.”

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